CIO Finance Summit | November 8-10, 2016 | Hotel Palomar Phoenix - Phoenix, AZ, USA

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Tuesday, November 8, 2016 - CIO Finance Summit

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Registration & Greeting

 

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Shuttle-Bus to Golf Tournament

 

2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Nine-Hole Golf Tournament

 

5:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Shuttle-Bus back from Golf Tournament

 

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Networking Cocktail Reception

 

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Networking Dinner

 

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

 

Wednesday, November 9, 2016 - CIO Finance Summit

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:50 am

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Keynote Presentation

Stop Being a Speed Bump on the Highway of Success

Since almost the very beginning of the IT department, much of the focus of IT professionals has been on integrating systems, applications, and data sets; on tying together the various components of the enterprise to drive single versions of the truth, and streamlined operational capabilities. As IT becomes more complex however, IT Leaders need to find a way to break this cycle or risk becoming mired in ever increasing integration webs, webs that demand 100% of their time and 100% of their budget. Future-proofed CIOs will break this cycle by deploying solutions that are inherently integrated because they are engineered to be integrated from the ground up. With integration a non-issue, these CIOs will be free to focus time and resources on the real challenges of the enterprise: driving growth.

Takeaways:

  • Understand the nature of the integration cycle – how it came to be and how problematic it really is
  • Learn about the new technology paradigms that offer integration out of the box
  • Develop a plan of attack that will leverage your time and your budget to allow you invest in business value growth
 

8:55 am - 9:35 am

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Keynote Presentation

TBD

Sponsored by:

EMC View details

 
 
 

9:45 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Creating New Revenue Streams

The economic downturn has had significant and long-lasting effects on the banking industry, not the least of which is the reduction in interest based revenue as a result of tightened lending regulations and increased lending reticence. As these revenues stagnate, financial services organizations are having to find new sources of revenue to not just try and drive growth, but to halt shrinkage, and fees alone aren’t going to bridge that gap. What are needed are new and appealing products and services that will draw clients back into a relationship and drive increased non-interest based revenue. This will be a tumultuous time for the IT department as the lines of business experiment to find the sweet spot and will need dynamic and flexible support from their technology arm. 

Takeaways: 

  • The saying “the only thing constant is change” hasn’t always applied to financial services but will increasingly do so in coming years 
  • New products and services along with new flexibility will be required to recapture losses still being felt from the economic downtown of 2008 
  • Now more than ever, the IT department will have to be prepared to be dynamic and innovative to deliver on revenue-generating business needs

Presented by:

Matthew Burris, Global Vice President- Data Science, Citi

 

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Think Tank

Fraud and Anti-Money Laundering: A House Divided?

While the link between anti-fraud and anti-money laundering capabilities may be easy to draw on the surface, far too often these capabilities are siloed within the typical financial services organization. Under the covers areas that seem to have commonality are often separated by radically different cultural approaches, with fraud staff coming from an operational or IT background and AML staff drawing from experience in compliance, legal, and GRC. The key to overcoming the challenges of team integration first and foremost comes down to system and data integration and those financial services institutions that are able to operate both groups from common platforms and intermingled data will find that silos naturally erode, that barriers do break down, and that the two groups begin to work efficiently and effectively together such that the whole really is greater than the sum of the parts.

Takeaways:

  • Don’t let the way things are be the way things will be; making a move forward is key to improving the performance of both the fraud and AML groups
  • Don’t let cultural differences be an impediment to integration; embrace the perspectives that each group brings to the situation to gain better visibility
  • Don’t expect change without investment; integrating systems and data will be the grease the facilitates working together but bringing things to a common platform will require time and, likely, money to make it work

Call for Speakers

 

10:20 am - 10:50 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Big Data Analytics and the Impact on Fraud

Financial fraud is, unfortunately a huge business, with annual losses so massive that were “Fraud” a country, it would have the fifth highest global GDP. While enterprises in the financial services sector have always used analytical processes to detect and limit those losses, as technology moves forward the analytical capabilities that can be brought to bear increase in exponentially in capability and those on the leading edge are able to see, and stop, more fraud in less time. Just as Big Data capabilities are bringing significant business benefit to other aspects of the business, they can to fraud mitigation but several challenges need to be overcome for maximum efficiency. Only by addressing quality, volume, security, and integration challenges and by further ensuring the right staff with the right skills are in place can benefits actually be realized.

Takeaways:

  • The increased use of unmanned technology combined with ever quicker financial transaction processing has created a world ripe for the proliferation of fraud
  • In a “fight fire with fire” approach, those same machine learning approaches can be repurposed to analyze transactions looking for the needle in the needlestack that is the illicit one
  • A Big Data approach only works with the right foundation; garbage in garbage out has never been more true and data and process rigor is essential to success
 

10:55 am - 11:25 am

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Cloud Adoption Challenges on a Macro Level

The hype around the cloud is pervasive and can be potentially overwhelming but numerous studies have shown that tangible benefits can be had, whether in cost savings, efficiency improvements, or flexibility enhancements. That said numerous impediments exist to not just realizing that value, but even considering adoption; regulatory issues, integration challenges, business process revamp, and a dozen other challenges can halt cloud projects in their tracks before they get off the ground. In this group discussion we’ll explore those inhibitors, understanding which challenges prevent adoption and what can be done to overcome them.

Takeaways:

  • The cloud presents a significant opportunity to organizations and while most have adopted in some form or other, wholesale adoption still lags
  • To realize benefits enterprises must deal with a variety of challenges each one requiring different solutions
  • Industry by industry adoption is constrained for different reasons but do common solutions exist that can resolve issues across the board?

Roundtable

Using Data & Analytics to Drive Business Transformation

Big Data initiatives have become a reality among almost every company today, however, what we have seen is lots of initiatives have become just science projects and did not deliver on early expectations. This situation needs to reversed quickly because those organizations that are being successful with Big Data and analytics programs are rapidly leaving those that are unsuccessful in their wake. Big Data and analytics has the potential to be transformational for the enterprise, but IT leaders need to be making the right investments, in the right areas, to ensure optimal success. This panel discussion will focus on how to use data and analytics to drive true business success and show some real examples of companies and individuals who made a difference.

Takeaways:

  • Analytics is not a new capability and has always been aligned with the most successful companies
  • The roles of IT and the lines of business are changing when it comes to data and analytics programs
  • The business benefits of analytics programs can be huge but efforts need to be constrained so that they don’t turn into flights of fancy, yet set free enough that they find the “unknown unknowns” that truly drive transformation
 

11:30 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Indoor Location Tracking and the Power of the Beacon

While smartphones and tablets are inherently mobile devices, invariably the humans that use them do so indoors, and while these devices have tremendous connectivity capabilities, in many case those indoor spaces block cell signals and the ability to track the device, and ultimately, its user. As businesses more and more are seeking to deliver customized, personalized experiences, knowing where each individual with whom you wish to interact with becomes a serious impediment to achieving that goal. Beacons, however, offer real promise in not only being able to track indoor location to a very granular degree, but to go one step further and initiate a personalized interaction that enhances both user experience and operational efficiency, truly a win-win then.

Takeaways:

  • Beacons are a low-cost micro-location based piece of technology that allow for short-range two-way communications
  • Beacons will be instrumental in delivering the personalized experience end users demand because they allow for persistent user identification and tracking
  • Beacons can also be used as a conduit to deliver that experience directly, sending information to devices, rather than just receiving it from them

Roundtable

IPv6 Adoption

As IT Leaders, we have all been aware of the impending need to move from IPv4 to IPv6 protocols as the number of available IP addresses withers to next to nothing. Many have deferred this task however, simply making use of private internal address spaces to defer the inevitable work. As IoT becomes a fait accompli however, ignoring the issue is no longer a viable alternative; to be able to connect and access the vast number of public sensors and other IoT devices IPv6 must be adopted wholesale. CIOs that have not yet done so must begin IPv6 migration projects now to ensure that they are not roadblocks to growth and innovation as a result of IoT adoption.

Takeaways:

  • Understand whether to build net new in parallel, or upgrade existing networks
  • Changes will extend beyond just the infrastructure – internal and external applications will be affected as will WAN service providers
  • IPv6 migration is not a trivial effort; significant upfront planning is required and this initiative cannot be handled in a reactionary manner
 

12:05 pm - 12:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Customer Engagement Trends in Financial Services

As banks around the world, but particularly in North America, struggles to overcome the broken trust with consumers as a result of the 2008 financial crisis, increasingly they are finding that enhanced customer engagement is the lever they must actuate. The complication for the financial services sector however, is that while they are trying to engage more with their customers, those customers are becoming harder to engage as they move to online and mobile banking channels wherever possible. Though these channels offer convenience for the customer, and the potential of cost savings for the bank, they limit interaction. Fortunately for CIOs this makes their role ever more important because interactions, and therefore the opportunity to engage, is occurring ever more through digital channels. As a result, CIOs need to become go-to executives within their organization to facilitate these positive experiences.

Takeaways:

  • Customer engagement is becoming the single biggest indicator of success for enterprises within the financial services sector
  • Engagement is made more difficult as consumers increasingly more away from braches and personal interactions
  • Engagement is a two-way street and banks must be prepared to listen and respond to consumer requests; IT must facilitate that and other processes

Presented by:

Shawn Edwards, Senior Director - Cyber Detection & Response, VISA View details

 
 

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Think Tank

What’s Next with Mobile Banking

Mobile technologies have swept the world, with the latest news that there are officially more such devices on the planet than there are people and across the board these devices have become the go-to way in which people interact with peers and providers. While banks have begun adopting mobile channels to engage and interact with their clients, they clearly need to go much, much further, embracing mobile payments (in store and for bills), P2P payments, and mobile only enrollments among other innovations. Wholesale adoption of mobile as the primary (and in some ways only) engagement and interaction channel means backend systems will need to be re-architected and CIOs need to begin thinking about the nature and scope of these changes, as well as initiating the dialogue about this revolution with their business partners now.

Takeaways:

  • With 1 million credit card enrollments in its first 72 hours, Apple Pay shows that the era of mobile payments, at least for consumers, is already here
  • Mobile check deposit is just the first wave in mobile banking; soon customers will expect to do all their banking through their mobile device
  • Mobile, and specifically P2P payments through mobile, will push IT systems to work faster than ever before; the IT department needs to be ready

Call for Speakers

 

12:40 pm - 1:40 pm

Networking Luncheon

 

1:45 pm - 2:15 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Driving an Omni-Channel Experience in Financial Services

Maintaining a consistent client experience is key to ensuring a consistent client relationship, which in turn leads to greater client retention and spend. Maintaining that consistent experience is complicated by the fact that clients now interact with all providers, not just financial services ones, through a variety of channels that can number into the dozens. It is essential to not have just consistency of look and feel across all channels, but consistency of experience, and indeed to allow individual experiences to occur sequentially across all channels.

Takeaways:

  • Client experience is the primary motivator in client retention and reducing client churn is essential to controlling costs
  • Client experience degrades when channel experience conflicts or limits client choice or activity so consistency is key
  • Optimal experience needs a seamless client “experience ecosystem” that, done well, tightens bonds, reduces costs, and increases spend

Presented by:

Brian Lavery, SVP | US Technology Solutions, TD

 

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Think Tank

Transparency and the Changing Bank/Client Relationship

Historically, the relationship between and bank and its clients has been pretty one-sided with the bank, whether filling the role as lender or investor, holding many if not all of the cards and dictating the pace and nature of the relationship. The times though they are a-changing and, spurred by greater opportunity for control in others aspects of their commercial lives, consumers are increasingly demanding visibility into processes, which is often translating into greater visibility into data – data about themselves, and data about the potential offerings available to them. This shifting boundary between provider and provided will require rapid re-architecting of supporting IT systems and CIOs will need to address a multitude of related challenges as a result.

Takeaways:

  • Customers are demanding more visibility than ever before and other markets have conditioned them to expect to receive it
  • Greater visibility will mean increase rate and speed of transactions as customer pace will now dictate relationships
  • In addition to greater real time capability, IT departments will be challenged to provide the needed data quality and data security to keep clients happy

Call for Speakers

 

2:20 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Bank Process Standardization and the Era of Banking as a Service

Banks have historically owned and operated all of the various functions related to the delivery of their services and have used these proprietary operations as business differentiators. Increased regulatory oversight has, however, forced standardization on many of these processes. While there have been benefits to the banks as a result (cost control being one of them), this standardization has created a world of service commoditization, not unlike what has been seen with cloud computing and related “as a Service” type offerings. The creation of Banking as a Service-type offerings will open potential revenue streams but require that significant technology hurdles be overcome and those CIOs that get ahead of the curve will set their organizations up for success at the direct expense of their less innovative and capable peers.

Takeaways:

  • Operational processes, due to transparency and oversight requirements can no longer be considered “traditional” competitive advantages
  • Excellence however is a differentiator and greater facility with a standardized process is a way to regain that competitive advantage
  • New revenue channels are imperative for success and finding ways to make revenue off competitors increases the bottom line while weakening theirs
 

2:55 pm - 3:25 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Horizontal or Vertical? Finding the Right Cloud Fit

The vast majority of cloud services available on the market today are best described as horizontal offerings – the same feature set and functionalities offered to each enterprise regardless of the different market pressures those enterprises face. But “one-size-fits-all” horizontal offerings are not the only way in which cloud can be consumed because businesses aren’t one-size-fits-all in their individuals needs and approaches to their market spaces. As a result, vertical cloud offerings are increasingly coming to market. These solutions differ from private clouds in that they don’t offer that truly individual level of customization, instead providing a “one-size-fits-some” approach. The advantages of such an approach (semi-custom offering without the semi-custom pricing primarily) can make these solutions seem appealing, but IT leaders must determine whether the inherent risk of a smaller and more niche focused solution offsets the benefit of a more tailored and less generic offering.

Takeaways:

  • Vertical cloud offerings have existed since the beginning of the cloud but simply have not been as popular as the larger horizontal solutions on the market
  • Vertical offerings can be tremendously thin (focused) allowing them to be incredibly deep (tailored) but offerings generally come from smaller providers
  • The big boys are starting to take notice of vertical specialization and push into this market making partner selection confusing

Sponsored by:

Kofax View details

 
 

Roundtable

Implementing Business Simplification for Success and Growth

Organizational complexity is the single most significant impediment that enterprises are dealing with today; it underlies every business problem enterprises faces and undermines every effort to address them. Organizational complexity is grounded in cumbersome processes, but those poor processes exist only because enterprise applications themselves, including those that are customer facing, as well as those that are not, are complex and unwieldy. To address cultural complexity then, enterprises must eliminate the complexity in their application suite by either building new, buying new, or more efficiently simplifying what they already have. Only by simplification can enterprises eliminate complexity in an efficient and effective way and position themselves for success.

Takeaways:

  • Enterprises live and breath by the speed with which regular transactions occur – turning these into one minute transactions is the key to success
  • Complexity must be eliminated in all applications customer-facing, core internal, and internal supporting alike
  • Building or buying new, less complex applications offers limited gains because eventually all introduce complexities of their own; only simplified applications offer long term, sustained elimination of complexity
 

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Capacity Planning as Competitive Differentiator

Capacity planning has in many ways become a lost art; common during the era of the mainframe when resources were expensive and time-consuming to procure, the advent of the inexpensive pizza box Windows Server has relegated planning, replacing it with a “just buy more” mentality. But “just buy more” creates more problems than it solves as server sprawl, server management, and rampant overprovisioning issues quickly erode any aspect of the value that IT tries to deliver. The lost art need to be rediscovered, to allow IT to get back to offering truly efficient and effective service and service levels. This new era of capacity planning requires new tools that go beyond simplistic benchmarking and trending analysis and instead provides dynamic, flexible, and predictive modeling that allows IT department to truly deploy optimized IT services.

Takeaways:

  • Capacity management may have fallen out of favor but its abandonment has created a wealth of problems for IT and business users the world over
  • In an era of intense innovation pressure, enterprises can no longer afford the inefficiencies of a “just buy more” approach to capacity provisioning
  • Traditional capacity planning techniques certainly have value but dynamic modeling based on predictive analytics takes things to a whole new level

Roundtable

Multi-Platform Mobile Development

As enterprises take that deep dive into mobile computing, they move from simply allowing mobile devices into their environment towards leveraging those devices to fulfill roles and functions otherwise unaddressable by traditional devices. This means developing and deploying apps, but things aren’t as simple as “write once, publish many”. Leaving the issue of platform variability to the side, one of the biggest issues in app development is form factor differentiation and the clearest expression of that issue is the difference between smartphones and tablets. While Android co-founder Andy Rubin is on record as saying form factor should have no bearing, there is a strong body of evidence that says apps should be developed differently for different devices if the goal is the utmost usability and productivity. As IT leaders invest more heavily in mobile application development, this is an issue that requires significant deliberation to ensure development time and money is not squandered.

Takeaways:

  • Tablets are not simply Smartphones made bigger; they are unique devices with unique properties and unique capabilities
  • Users do not use tablets and smartphones to do the same things because they way they interact with them is different
  • Mobile development needs to determine if distinct tablet and smartphone apps are required by understanding use cases and device capabilities
 

4:05 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Banking at the Speed of Now

Banks, particularly investment banks, achieve success by making decisions more optimally throughout the course of the day, with those organizations that in a position to more optimally make more decisions coming out ahead. One of the key factors that go into decision optimization is speed, and having a real time view into data allows for quicker decisions. Whether it be executing on a trade, or providing instantaneous compliance oversight for fraud management the benefits of accelerated pace when it comes to decision-making are legion. As a result, businesses are actively pushing in this direction and banking CIOs are having to re-architect their systems to facilitate these demands; knowing how best to do so will separate the successful CIOs from the soon to be unemployed peers.

Takeaways:

  • Recent financial regulations have required much greater demands in terms of compliance and look-back reporting is no longer sufficient
  • Trading volumes have increased almost exponentially in the last few years alone and capitalizing on trends means getting to insight quicker
  • Changes to the backend IT infrastructure to support these real time demands must be addressed now

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Think Tank

Creating the Bank of the Future

It's well documented that Millennials are significantly different than any previous generation. Their purchase behavior, borrowing and savings behavior, ethnic diversity and use of digital technology are causing banks to rethink how they deliver services and engage what is now the largest generational population in the country. Understanding the dynamics of this generation and its impact on the bank of the future including marketing, branch strategies, online banking and portfolio management is essential for long term success.

Takeaways:

  • Dive into the differences between Millennials and other generations to understand what makes them different and what makes them tick
  • Be exposed to the demands of this generation to see how that will impact future decision making
  • Learn how to develop the plan to transition from the bank of today to the bank of tomorrow

Call for Speakers

 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

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Executive Visions

Diversity in IT

The importance technology plays within an enterprise will only continue to gain momentum as more developers, engineers, and programmers enter the workforce. As these segments continue to grow, so does the diversity of the workforce within the technology field. For a field that is severely constrained by a talent and skills gap, this influx of bodies can only be a good thing. Beyond the basic ability to deliver of identified capabilities a diverse workforce, whether cultural or gender influenced offers a whole that is more than the sum of the parts. Finding ways to drive and increase diversity in IT then should be a key focus for every IT executive.

Takeaways:

  • Identify the importance behind diversity in technology, opportunities, and capabilities
  • Discuss the importance of cultivating diversity at the grass-roots level and building post-secondary programs that drive awareness of and interest in IT
  • Understand the hurdles that exist that limit the prevalence of diversity in IT, and what steps must be taken to lower, if not eliminate, them
 

5:20 pm - 6:30 pm

Networking Cocktail Reception

 

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Networking Dinner

 

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

After Dinner Networking

 

Thursday, November 10, 2016 - CIO Finance Summit

7:00 am - 8:05 am

Networking Breakfast

 

8:10 am - 8:50 am

Keynote Presentation

Disrupting Markets with Disruptive Technologies

While the combination of Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud have been present and disrupting IT departments and enterprises as a whole for over two years now, in many ways organizations have still not fully embraced them, have still not fully leveraged them. These new platforms allow organizations radically new ways to go to market, allowing for broad scale deployment of “systems of engagement” that create dynamic relationships with clients and prospects. Finding the resources, wherewithal, and ability to fully commit to these technologies and the capabilities they create has proven to be a struggle for many, but a struggle that can be overcome by leveraging the right partners that bring the right skills and experiences to bear.

Takeaways:

  • Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud are all here to stay; each one adds value to enterprises but collectively that value increases exponentially
  • The manner in which these technologies are implemented, operated, and utilized is different than the foregoing systems of record we are used to
  • Unique skills and capabilities are required to leverage the power and value of these platforms, skills and capabilities that can be in short supply
 

8:55 am - 9:35 am

Keynote Presentation

TBD

Sponsored by:

Gurucul View details

 
 
 

9:45 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

CIO Think Tank

Cloud and the IT Department of the future

On the surface, wholesale adoption of cloud delivered services seems to signal the end of the IT department as we know it as the vast majority of the extant roles and responsibilities become outsourced. While that may be true, it doesn’t necessarily mean the end of the IT department in its entirety. A variety of studies have shown that expansion of the IT department is just as likely as contraction as a result of broader cloud adoption. While the sysadmins and other server-huggers may well go away cloud adoption signals growth in at least four keys areas: Business Management, Vendor Management, Information Security, and Systems Integration. IT Leaders must begin the work now of recasting their IT department to position is for success if the brave new cloud world.

Takeaways:

  • Cloud does not spell the death knell for the IT department and could well signal an actual growth 
  • The skills required in a cloud world are different than those in an on-prem world, but in many ways are “higher order” skill sets that offer greater business value 
  • As skills demand increases, CIOs will have to figure out whether to build, buy, or borrow the resources with the right capabilities

Presented by:

Radha Kuchibhotla, VP IT, State Street View details

 
 

Think Tank

Rise of the Alternate Lender

The banking industry is one that rarely would be described as “innovative”, with all players seemingly taking a “what’s good for one is good for all” approach where no-one particularly upsets the status quo in anything but small and incremental ways. If the latest evidence from the European market is anything to go by, however, the potential exists that a major shakeup could be in the offing as a host of so-called “Challenger” banks are bursting onto the scene. Whether from upstart financial services organizations, of companies entrenched in non-related fields such as retail, new entrants are coming to market that having nothing invested in old school processes, not in the semi-competitive landscape that currently exists. Change is coming and Financial Services CIOs need to look to their own house to ensure the people, processes, and technologies are in place to respond to this new threat.

Takeaways:

  • Since the financial collapse of 2008, most consumers have felt an eroded sense of trust with incumbent banks that they do not feel with alternate lenders
  • Challengers are not tied to outdated and expensive products, back-end processes, or technology allowing them to cherry-pick and do so economically
  • Changes in the UK, Europe, and Canadian marketplaces mean change is imminent in the US
 

10:20 am - 10:50 am

Executive Exchange

 

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Thought Leadership

Build a strategic view of your customer journey

You may not realize that your customers are on a journey, but they know. The customer experience consists of a series of touchpoints, from marketing to purchase to servicing. In Insurance, each one of these touchpoints is a moment of truth, an opportunity to either improve or reduce customer satisfaction. In today’s competitive, rapidly evolving market, customer satisfaction is one true durable competitive advantage.  

Do you have a good understanding of these customer touchpoints, and how effective each one is? Are these customer touchpoints improving the customer experience, or making it worse? Can you build a strategic view, and keep that view up to date? Many companies take an offline approach to building customer journey maps. However, with the rapid proliferation of channels, keeping these offline models up to date is a huge challenge, as is effectively tying in key performance indicators. 

With GMC Software’s new Customer Journey Mapping technology you can build a true strategic view of all touchpoints, and show how those touchpoints link into a journey. With Social Commenting and other collaborative tools, you can involve all departments in maintaining these maps, and ensuring that each one remains relevant and effective. 

Takeaways:

  • Learn about how customer journey maps can improve your customer experience
  • Learn how to effectively build a strategic view of customer touchpoints
  • Learn how to improve organizational collaboration with GMC Customer Journey Mapping

Sponsored by:

GMC Software Technology View details

 
 
 

10:55 am - 11:25 am

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

TBD

Sponsored by:

Darktrace View details

 
 

Roundtable

Ensuring Data Quality

Data quality is one of the most critical issues facing every enterprise and whether data be duplicate, stale, incomplete, invalid, conflicting or just plain incorrect the impact of enterprise decision making and ultimately enterprise success and be significant and severe. As the number of data sources grows, as the speed with which data is collected and utilized increases, and as the raw volume expands almost exponentially, the impacts of poor data quality becomes more significant than ever before. IT executives must build strong data governance capabilities to ensure that enterprise data is kept unique, timely, complete, valid, consistent, and accurate.

Takeaways:

  • Data quality is not a new problem but the advent of the IoT age means that it will be a problem of greater relevance than ever before
  • The process by which data quality can be addressed isn’t fun or “sexy” but where enterprises have often ignored it to date they can no longer do so
  • Enterprises that do not proactively address data quality now may find that IoT is their downfall rather than their savior
 

11:30 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

NFV and SDN – Building the Network of the Future

Cloud has changed the way we build back-end systems, mobility has changed the way we build the front end too, and now the combination of Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and Software Defined Networking (SDN) is going to change the way we build networks. By allowing for the separation of control plane and data plane while simultaneously migrating both of those pieces to inexpensive commodity hardware we allow for the creation of more redundant, more dynamic, more efficient, and far less costly networks, eliminating a major bottle-neck to IT and service innovation. CIOs must begin investigating and implementing these technologies now to ensure they are on the leading edge of service delivery.

Takeaways:

  • The traditional way of building networks is archaic and its lifespan limited – NFV and SDN promise far greater flexibility of cost effectiveness
  • These technologies are admittedly early phase, but so were cloud and mobility when they began radically changing the technology landscape
  • Now is the time to begin to invest in pilot projects, to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to leverage the technologies as they mature

Roundtable

Understanding the Sourcing Journey

Entering into sourcing relationships is not something that should be taken lightly; this is not simply a “to source or not to source?” question. In any sourcing decision there are a number of essential steps that must be considered, breaking the decisions down into three core areas: those prior to agreement, those during turn up of the service, and those that occur during the life of the agreement. Join our esteemed panelists as they talk candidly about their sourcing journey, the hurdles they encountered, and just what they had to do to overcome them.

Takeaways:

  • The sourcing journey is not just a simple go/no-go decision; along the way there are numerous decision points that are encountered
  • CIOs must have a very clear understanding of their needs and expectations, to be able to make the right choice for their organization
  • Time and effort needs to be invested in not just the service and the technology, but in the impact on people and on the relationship itself
 

12:05 pm - 12:45 pm

Executive Visions

Facilitating Technology-Enabled Business Transformation

The role of the modern CIO is more complex than it has ever been before, not just because the technology landscape has become more complex, but also because increasingly the CIO has had to become a business-focused executive, not just a technologist. Long have we talked about the CIO “getting a seat at the table” but modern businesses are now demanding that their technology impresario join them and leverage his deep and rich technical acumen to allow the organization as a whole to better position itself for market-place success. To be successful, CIOs need to invest in themselves, in their personnel, and in the right technologies to allow them to position the IT department to proactively address business needs as an innovator and driver, rather than order-taker and enabler.

Takeaways:

  • IT leadership can no longer be simply technology focused, but must instead take their visibility into business process and become business focused
  • A broader business-focus does not preclude maintaining technology excellence however and indeed may demand more of it than ever before
  • Success for CIOs will be measured not in how they can enable enterprise decisions, but in how they can drive growth
 

12:45 pm - 12:55 pm

Closing Remarks

 

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Grab and Go Luncheon